Raw Milk as a Potential Source of Food Poisoning Outbreaks

Authors

  • Isa Shu’aibu Department of Microbiology, Gombe State University, P.M.B. 127, Gombe State, Nigeria.
  • Habiba Abdullahi Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Science, Gombe State University (GSU), P.M.B 127, Gombe, Gombe state, Nigeria.
  • S. Hanna Kadum Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Al-Muthanna University, Iraq.
  • A. Jabir Hamza Department of Pharmaceutical Microbiology, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Gombe State University, P.M.B. 127, Gombe State Nigeria.
  • Y. Kabiru Mustapha College of Health sciences, Maryam Abacha American University of Niger, ADS Avenue, Roy Mohd VI, Du Maroc, Maradi, Republic Du Niger.
  • T. Adamu Muhammad Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Science, Gombe State University (GSU), P.M.B 127, Gombe, Gombe state, Nigeria.
  • Lawal Garba Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Science, Gombe State University (GSU), P.M.B 127, Gombe, Gombe state, Nigeria.
  • Khairiyya Muhammad Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Science, Gombe State University (GSU), P.M.B 127, Gombe, Gombe state, Nigeria.
  • A. Garkuwa Nuru Department of Biological Sciences, Gombe State University, P.M.B. 127, Gombe State, Nigeria.
  • M. Ahmad Mani Department of Biological Sciences, Kano University of Science and Technology Wudil, Kano State, Nigeria.
  • G. Gurama Abubakar Department of Pharmaceutical Microbiology, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Gombe State University, P.M.B. 127, Gombe State Nigeria.

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.54987/jebat.v4i2.629

Keywords:

Raw milk, Bacterial pathogens, Microbiological quality, Standard plate count, Kwami

Abstract

In Africa, the use of poor and unhygienic methods for animal milking and milk processing that leads to spoilage of milk by microbes affects the production of milk and dairy products, especially in the small scale and local processing plants. This study was conducted to analyze the quality and safety of raw milk collected from six different towns in Kwami local government area of Gombe State, Nigeria. The samples were serially diluted using ten-fold dilution and used aliquot 1 ml to inoculate the appropriate media using pour plate technique. The total viable count for bacteria in CFU/ml on plate count agar (PCA) was highest in sample E from U/Anchau with an average of total viable count of 3.8x104 CFU/ml, followed by 3.0x104 CFU/ml in sample B (Dirri), then 2.8x104 CFU/ml in sample D from Burakosuma, 2.5x104 CFU/ml in sample F from Dun urji, 2.3x104 CFU/ml in sample C from Zanbe with least count from sample A at Bele as 1.8x104 CFU/ml. Five (5) bacterial species of public health importance were isolated and identified using biochemical tests namely; Enterobacter sp., Yersinia enterocolitica, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Salmonella sp.. Out of the organisms isolated, Enterobacter sp. had the highest occurrence of 93% (n=280), then Yersinia enterocolitica 90% (n=270), E. coli 70% (n=210), S. aureus 57% (n=170), and finally Salmonella sp. 23% (n=70). Based on the microbiological outcomes, preventive measures for milking and processing that focus on training of farmers and dairy employees for the improvement of the hygiene of local milk and dairy production chain should be defined.

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Published

2021-12-31

How to Cite

Shu’aibu, I., Abdullahi, H., Hanna Kadum, S., Hamza, A. J., Mustapha, Y. K., Muhammad, T. A., Garba, L., Muhammad, K., Nuru, A. G., Mani, M. A., & Abubakar, G. G. (2021). Raw Milk as a Potential Source of Food Poisoning Outbreaks. Journal of Environmental Bioremediation and Toxicology, 4(2), 23–26. https://doi.org/10.54987/jebat.v4i2.629

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Articles